Poor Sleep Can Negatively Affect a Student’s Grades, Increase the Odds of Emotional and Behavioral Disturbance

http://www.aasmnet.org/articles.aspx?id=873

WESTCHESTER, Ill. – Insufficient sleep among adolescents may not only contribute to lower grades and a lack of motivation, but may also increase the odds of serious levels of emotional and behavioral disturbances, including ADHD, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Monday at SLEEP 2008, the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS).

The study, authored by Fred Danner, PhD, of the University of Kentucky, focused on 882 high school freshmen who provided information about their sleep habits and school grades and also completed psychological and behavioral assessments.

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Adolescent Sleep, School Start Times, and Teen Motor Vehicle Crashes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2603528/

There is considerable evidence that a majority of adolescents do not get enough sleep for optimal functioning during the day.The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control1The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control–The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control3 It is also clear that driving while drowsy is a serious traffic safety problem, especially among young drivers.The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control4The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control–The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control6 Both social and biologic pressures appear to cause a shift in sleep patterns during the transition to adolescence, with the result that adolescents stay up progressively later as they progress through high school.The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control7The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control–The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control9 Therefore, early school start times for adolescents decrease their sleep, which increases their daytime sleepiness,The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control8 which may, in turn, increase their odds of crashing their vehicles while driving.

Snooze or Lose

http://nymag.com/news/features/38951/index1.html

Dr. Avi Sadeh of Tel Aviv University is one of the authorities in the field. A couple of years ago, Sadeh sent 77 fourth-graders and sixth-graders home with randomly drawn instructions to either go to bed earlier or stay up later for three nights. Each child was given an actigraph (a wristwatchlike device that’s equivalent to a seismograph for sleep activity), which enabled Sadeh’s team to learn that the first group managed to get 30 minutes more sleep per night. The latter got 31 minutes less sleep.


After the third night’s sleep, a researcher went to the school in the morning to test the children’s neurobiological functioning. The test they used is highly predictive of both achievement-test scores and how teachers will rate a child’s ability to maintain attention in class.

LATER START TIMES FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

http://www.cehd.umn.edu/research/highlights/Sleep/

Since 1996, Kyla Wahlstrom and her research team at the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement (CAREI) have led the way in the study of later start times for high school students, beginning with their study of the impact of later start times on educational achievement in two different districts.

Aging in Brain Found to Hurt Sleep Needed for Memory

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/28/health/brain-aging-linked-to-sleep-related-memory-decline.html

Scientists have known for decades that the ability to remember newly learned information declines with age, but it was not clear why. A new study may provide part of the answer.

The report, posted online on Sunday by the journal Nature Neuroscience, suggests that structural brain changes occurring naturally over time interfere with sleep quality, which in turn blunts the ability to store memories for the long term.

Reading Exercise Spawned Book by Anchorage Third-Grader

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20130313/ZONE05/303130004/Reading-exercise-spawned-book-by-Anchorage-third-grader?nclick_check=1

When Astrid Mayer began to struggle with reading comprehension at school, a specialist recommended she start reading with her parents every night and visualizing what she read. Astrid, 9, and her father, Trace Mayer, took the advice one step further and began crafting a story of their own. For 10 minutes every night the father and daughter, who live in Anchorage, would piece together a story line and draw pictures. “It really helped me with reading,” said Astrid, who is in the third grade at Anchorage School.

How To Start Using Google Apps In Education

http://edudemic.com/2013/03/how-to-start-using-google-apps-in-education/

As teachers, our plates are perpetually and impossibly full. The idea of adding one more component – such as incorporating technology into instruction – can seem daunting to say the least. In my own attempts to incorporate technology into my practice, Google has been the most valuable tool I have found thus far. Not only does it increase my ability to organize my instructional tools, but it also allows me to incorporate more technology when I feel ready to do so.