The 13-Year-Old Who Is Championing World Literacy, a Million Books at a Time

By  | The Good News – Tue, Jan 28, 2014 5:26 PM EST

Freedom begins in the mind, and one 13-year-old girl aims to liberate children the world over with a book campaign to advocate world literacy.

When she was only 8, Maria Keller took it upon herself to begin collecting books for kids. She founded her own nonprofit, Read Indeed, and this month surpassed her goal of sending over a million books to children in various parts of the globe.

Read full article here.

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Technology -> Schools -> Our kids

So when I ran across the article below, it made me think back to the 2012-2013 school year, when a school district in the city I live spent the better part of $200,000 for iPads for an elementary grade level that was under-performing with their reading skills.

If I was a member of that school district, I would have some serious questions for the school board. I know that no amount of technology is going to teach a child the way a hands on approach can. I see that with the reading teacher for my children. The only technology she uses is a smart board that allows her to go through the photocopied, phonics worksheets she has created from scratch. It helps keep all the class on the same page and it allows for a succinct delivery of the decoding of the English language.

As Schools Jump to Tablets, Questions Linger Over Impact on Writing and Reading Skills.

Making a rhyme all the time

So if someone has asked me before the thought of kids had come in to my mind how my poetry skills were, I would have laughed. Aside from love endearing penmanship attempts that helped win over my love, I would have said “eh, ok”.

Here I am juggling around an active pre-pre-schooler and a first-grader and I find myself singing to them the silly songs I make up to emphasize an idea or a point. The thesaurus and I have become very good friends.

I ran across this blog (see link below) and the message there seemed to drive home an underlying plan that I myself had not written down.

10 Ways to Raise a Reader by Matthew Brown

Reading, reciting and singing Mother Goose rhymes to our children might seem old-fashioned today, but it is an excellent way to help children get ready to read. Nursery rhymes are more than just short stories or songs;

Do Textbooks Still Have a Place in Schools?

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/finding_common_ground/2013/03/do_textbooks_still_have_a_place_in_schools.html

Most toddlers walk around with their little blankets. Of course, they call them binkies, blankies and a whole list of other cute names. Just like Linus, toddlers feel unsafe without their blankets because it offers them a level of safety. To young children, it feels unnatural to sit in their carriage or on their bed without their favorite comfort item clutched in their hand.

Kalamazoo Promise analysis: Focus on literacy paying off in higher reading scores

http://www.mlive.com/news/kalamazoo/index.ssf/2013/03/tracking_academic_progress_in.html

KALAMAZOO, MI — In fall 2008, 29 percent of fourth-graders in Kalamazoo Public Schools scored in the bottom tier on the Michigan Educational Assessment Program reading test.

10 Ideas to Encourage Your Kids to Read After School

http://abullseyeview.com/target-inner-circle-kara-fleck-10-ideas-to-encourage-your-kids-to-read-after-school/

We all know that reading plays a vital role in a child’s education. For some kids, a love of reading comes naturally, while other children might be reluctant readers.

Once the school bell rings, it is up to parents and caregivers to help develop reading skills with their kids and create a home environment that promotes and encourages reading.