The 13-Year-Old Who Is Championing World Literacy, a Million Books at a Time

By  | The Good News – Tue, Jan 28, 2014 5:26 PM EST

Freedom begins in the mind, and one 13-year-old girl aims to liberate children the world over with a book campaign to advocate world literacy.

When she was only 8, Maria Keller took it upon herself to begin collecting books for kids. She founded her own nonprofit, Read Indeed, and this month surpassed her goal of sending over a million books to children in various parts of the globe.

Read full article here.

Advertisements

I wonder how much bedtime reading takes place here?

My wife and I tag team the reading activities in our household. I am a big proponent of literacy for children, actually I wonder who would be against that. Nevertheless, our older child has taken an active role in teaching our youngest phonograms (Based on the Spalding method of explicit phonics) and has begun to construct “homework” activities for her, here at home.

Homework Time

Little sister learning Spalding explicit phonics from her big brother.

I confess that I don’t weave any Royals into the stories we read here at home, for now, we just stick to the classics.

C
 

Reading Exercise Spawned Book by Anchorage Third-Grader

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20130313/ZONE05/303130004/Reading-exercise-spawned-book-by-Anchorage-third-grader?nclick_check=1

When Astrid Mayer began to struggle with reading comprehension at school, a specialist recommended she start reading with her parents every night and visualizing what she read. Astrid, 9, and her father, Trace Mayer, took the advice one step further and began crafting a story of their own. For 10 minutes every night the father and daughter, who live in Anchorage, would piece together a story line and draw pictures. “It really helped me with reading,” said Astrid, who is in the third grade at Anchorage School.

The Curse of Non-Cursive Writing

http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2013/03/14/essay-why-professors-should-object-failure-teaching-cursive

A recent news item cut me to the nib. Many public schools no longer teach cursive writing; 46 states no longer mandate that districts must teach cursive in their language arts core curriculum. This comes from the mistaken logic that our keyboard-happy society has made cursive a relic of the past that students no longer need. Numerous public schools now teach only printing, and some don’t even bother with lower and upper case – just block letters. Roman Catholic schools still demand cursive, and good for them. For the foreseeable future, kids who don’t have cursive will be at a competitive disadvantage. I’m surprised parents aren’t on the pitchfork-and-torch brigade over this, but I’d like to suggest that college professors should be (especially if they have kids).

Stemming the Tide of English-Learner Dropouts

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/learning-the-language/2013/03/stemming_the_tide_of_english-l.html

English-language learners are two times more likely to drop out of school than their peers who are either native English speakers or former ELLs who have become fluent in the language—a trend that, if unabated, will have far-reaching negative consequences, says a new report.

States adopting laws requiring third graders to pass reading test or face retention

http://legalclips.nsba.org/?p=18686

The Washington Post reports that a growing number of states are drawing a hard line in elementary school, requiring children to pass a reading test in third grade or be held back from fourth grade. Thirteen states last year adopted laws that require schools to identify, intervene and, in many cases, retain students who fail a reading proficiency test by the end of third grade. Lawmakers in several other states and the District of Columbia are debating similar measures. Not every state requires retention; some allow schools to promote struggling readers to fourth grade as long as they are given intensive help.

Do Textbooks Still Have a Place in Schools?

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/finding_common_ground/2013/03/do_textbooks_still_have_a_place_in_schools.html

Most toddlers walk around with their little blankets. Of course, they call them binkies, blankies and a whole list of other cute names. Just like Linus, toddlers feel unsafe without their blankets because it offers them a level of safety. To young children, it feels unnatural to sit in their carriage or on their bed without their favorite comfort item clutched in their hand.